Project 1

Post project materials and final documentation below.
Please include a title, brief statement, and hi-res image files*, PDF files, links to video, etc.

*(hi-res means at least 150dpi RGB, 1800×1200 px, about 5-10mb)
Here’s a sample documentation page from last year, FYI.

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Helen Nie | When I Grow Up

Materials: Vinyl decal

Site: Locust Walk at the McNeil Building (3718 Locust Walk)

Statement:

A veterinarian. An astronaut. A firefighter.

Installed during Penn’s “OCR” season, this project uses typography to shed light on the glorified culture of status and prestige that is the recruitment process. The commentary confronts less the role itself, and more the way that job titles have evolved to use inflated jargon to become convoluted, ambiguous, or outright absurd.

Pulled verbatim from Handshake, Penn’s recruiting platform, and set in italicized Times New Roman, the phrases were cut from vinyl and placed on the sidewalk curb lining McNeil—Penn’s Career Services building.

Coupled with its location and its coincidence with recruitment season, the job titles, albeit strange, should be familiar to passersby and prompt reflection on what they actually want to be when they “grow up”.

Article in DP

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Ying Luo | Making Space

Materials: Photo Tex repositionable fabric and masking tape

Site: Addams Hall Second Floor, 200 S 36th St, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Statement:

This project is about the process and meaning of art, design and creativity. It focuses on the space where artists and designers work, which I call a “Making Space”. Installed on the wall in the second floor lobby, which is the first space people would encounter when getting off from the elevator or the stairs, it mimics the floor plan of the building and seems to serve to help the visitor navigating through this space. The words in the boxes, which correspond to the physical locations of the rooms, are abstract references to what is happening in the space. The words are pulled from quotes of artists, architects and photographers as reflection of the process of thinking, making, and creating.

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Kate Jeon | We Are for Each Other

Materials: Mylar (matte)
Site: Addams Hall Clutter Gallery
Statement:

In the last 5 years, we have lost 14 students to suicide.

With each passing, are we taking time to consider how to prevent such a tragedy from occurring again?

Every day, we ask each other, “How are you?” and are content with the mindless answer, “I’m good.” Are we asking that question out of habit or from a genuine curiosity to see how the other person is doing?

Depression isn’t obvious. But we should take the time to pause and recognize when someone around us is struggling with this invisible battle. Too often do these individuals go unnoticed—we must be more informed, attentive, and proactive about preventing this illness from taking another life. One in four young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 have a diagnosable mental health disorder¹, yet the stigmatization of mental health inhibits us from having an open dialogue about an issue that affects so many communities around the nation. It is up to each one of us to remind ourselves of this invisibility and be more vigilant in caring for those around us.

¹ National Institute of Mental Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, http://www.nimh.nih.gov.

Article in DP
Article in Inside Higher Education

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Daniel Moreno | Slow Down

Documentation

Materials: Aluminum, Highway Spray Paint, Vinyl, LED Matrix, Raspberry Pi, Arduino Uno, Python, Java

Site: 3619 Locust Walk, University of Pennsylvania

Statement:

Being in a perpetual state of rush seems to be an inescapable part of the Penn experience. With so much to do, there is usually very littel time to take a step back, breath it all in and “stop and smell the roses”. Penn’s artery, Locust Walk, is where I believe this sentiment is exacerbated the most. Students, faculty, tourists and more populate the walkway, usually moving at breakneck speeds.

I am intrigued by the dynamics of Locust Walk and its unspoken traffic laws, such as walking on the right side of the walk, avoiding eye contact with people no longer relevant in our lives, avoiding obnoxious flyer-ers and never, ever, stopping in the middle of the Walk for more than a brief second. I took this upon myself as a challenge: How can I make people stop and linger, even if for a second?

This installation was milled out of a piece of aluminum I bought and connected to a portable computer running a custom program that tracks the motion of objects that cross the field of a tiny camera. I display the speed of the last object on the screen, so onlookers can gauge how quickly they are moving. While the numbers aren’t necessarily exact, my hope is that this interactive piece will get people to wonder ‘why the hell is this sign in the middle of Locust Walk telling me to Slow Down?’ and maybe they will let their mind be free to linger.

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Sarah Holland | Because I Love You

Materials: Chalk spray-paint over stencil

Location: Sidewalks across Philadelphia, 45th to 2nd Street

This project was instigated by the artist’s environment and inspired by the internet campaigns of an organization against domestic violence, the One Love Foundation. 1 in 3 women, and 1 in 4 men, will be victims of domestic violence in their lifetime. The risk is three times greater for women aged 16 to 24. The project questions why such a prevalent criminal phenomenon lies under the surface of societal perspective, instead being seen as something that only happens in the slums of our communities, in the darkest of places. In reality, domestic violence occurs everywhere and to everyone. It happens so often and so invisibly because it is posed as something intimate, something done out of love. It is the quiet control that an abuser holds over his partner, it is the threats that prevent the victim from leaving, it is the belief that they hurt you because they love you. The phrases the artist chose to replicate in this project are phrases which are commonly uttered in situations of sexual, emotional, physical, financial, and all other kinds of domestic violence. Scattered on sidewalks across Philadelphia, the pairing of the shocking phrases with pink spray-paint and a sweet “xoxo” send-off is intended to spark first curiosity, and then active disgust in the viewer. This project encourages the public to reconsider their understanding of expressions of love in light of the ever-present shadow of domestic violence — because I love you. 

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Esther Jeon | Wholesome Music

Materials : Matte paper and push pins

Size : 41 x 25.67 in

Site : Posting kiosks on Locust Walk (40th, 38th, 36th & Locust, 36th & Spruce, 34th & Walnut)

Typeface : Helvetica

Statement : If you take a look at Billboard’s Hot 100, you’ll see Taylor Swift, Justin Bieber, Rihanna, and many more artists that have created songs that we can’t seem to get out of our heads. They’re catchy and addictive. But are we really understanding the lyrics? I did some research and found that the lyrics are mostly provocative, explicit, and sexual. Through this series of posters, I wanted to question the message of music nowadays. To do this, I contrasted the lyrics with songs from Billboard’s Top 50 from the 1960s. The songs from the past seemed, to me, to be more poetic and gentle. I decided to mash the lyrics together so they share a word together and intersect. In this way, I want to show that though they essentially say similar ideas, the way it is presented is totally different. The nonsensical reading top-down furthers the idea of contrasting lyrics to show how much has changed over time. Where did wholesome music go?

 

 

 

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Andrew Shen | “But where are you really from?”

Materials: Laptop, Projector

Site: University of Pennsylvania’s Perry World House, 3803 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Typeface: Berthold Akzidenz Grotesk Bold Extended

Statement:

When I was traveling around Europe this summer, people would always ask me “where are you from?” I’d usually respond with “America,” to which I’d almost always get “but where are you really from? China? Japan?,” as though I’d misunderstood the question. This animation is an attempt at capturing the provocative nature of the question and challenging the notion of what it means to be “American”; each frame of the animation consists of a different country flag overlaid on top of the U.S. Flag. Projected onto the walls of the Perry World House during an event intended to celebrate global community at Penn, this project seeks to raise questions about identity specifically as it pertains to race and culture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mana Sazegara | AM I AT HOME ANYMORE

Materials
Canvas, Acrylic, 3d Printed Letter Stamps

Site
UPenn Campus

Artist Statement
On January 27 2017 the President of the United States issued an executive order banning entry of citizens from seven country of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen for three months. On Sunday, September 24 2017, he issued his third travel ban; but this time not as an temporary executive order but as a permanent rule.

As the result millions of people, has forced to not seeing their beloved ones for who knows how long. A decision which has made thousands of students like myself, who has put all their efforts to build their dreams in the so-called “Land of Opportunity” to believe they do not belong to this land anymore.

HOME IS THE PLACE WHERE, WHEN YOU
HAVE TO GO THERE, THEY TAKE YOU IN
A CENTER OF UNIVERSE
IS THE PLACE YOU SOMEHOW HAVEN’T TO DESERVE
SOMEWHERE TO HIDE WHEN YOU FEEL SCARED
A PLACE YOU CAN LIVE WITHOUT FEAR OF
LETTING SOMEONE DOWN EVER
A SPACE OF HIDE FOREVER
HOME IS
A PLACE OF NO EXILE
A PLACE OF NO EXILE
AM I AT HOME ANYMORE

 

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